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Other inductees

Business Insider – Rob Price

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the ACORN employee’s lawsuit was on grounds of defamation instead of invasion of privacy. The article also incorrectly stated that O’Keefe issued an apology. It also did not mention the judge’s dismissal of the case in North Carolina.

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Slate – Aaron Mak

In a July 11 Industry, Aaron Mak wrongly stated that a lawsuit brought by a former ACORN employee against James O’Keefe had to do with misrepresentation. It pertained to
surreptitious recording.

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The Daily Banter – Wes Williams

Daily Banter’s article originally stated that James O'Keefe entered Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu's office in order to tap the phones, which is a lie. O'Keefe was never found guilty of that charge, and the “journalist” corrected his false statements. Daily Banter admitted that O’Keefe’s intent was to record a conversation with the Senator’s staff about the phone calls the staffers were receiving. 

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Bloomberg – Alyza Sebenius and Ben Brody

The article is corrected to clarify the characterization of Project Veritas in the 12th paragraph.

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The Philadelphia Inquirer – Rob Tornoe

An earlier version of this article falsely stated that James O’Keefe had twisted a former ACORN employee’s intention in a video, and also said that O’Keefe broke into Senator Mary Landrieu’s office in a separate incident. The Philadelphia Inquirer updated the article to reflect that the former ACORN employee’s intentions were not twisted, and that O’Keefe never broke into the Senator’s office.

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CBS San Francisco Bay Area

The article failed to mention that the former ACORN employee who sued James O’Keefe
was fired as a result of the ACORN video being released by O’Keefe. The article was updated to explain what took place more accurately.

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Rewire – Sharona Coutts

An earlier version of this article stated that James O’Keefe was convicted for the crime of wire-tapping Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu’s office, which is completely false. Rewire corrected the article and reported that O’Keefe pled guilty to entering a federal building under false pretenses, which is a misdemeanor.

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Mic – Jack Smith IV

A previous version of this article stated that James O’Keefe broke into Senator Mary Landrieu’s office in Louisiana and attempted to alter the phone systems there. Both of those statements are completely false. The article was later corrected in order to accurately explain the truth of what happened in that situation.

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Sentinel Source – Len Fleischer

This article made two absurdly false claims about James O’Keefe. Their first lie was when Sentinel Source said O’Keefe faced a criminal lawsuit on the ACORN videos, which they later corrected to say O’Keefe settled a lawsuit but was not charged nor convicted of a crime for that matter. The second lie by Sentinel Source was about the Louisiana incident, saying that O’Keefe was convicted of a felony charge for breaking into Senator Landrieu’s office and tampering with her phones. Sentinel Source corrected the article to admit those things did not happen, and O’Keefe only faced misdemeanor charges for entering the building under false pretenses.

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 Mediaite – Caleb Ecarma

The original version of this article stated that James O’Keefe had been hit with a felony conviction in the Louisiana / Senator Mary Landrieu incident. That is obviously not true. The charge which O’Keefe eventually pleaded guilty to was a misdemeanor.

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 Time – Philip Elliott

An earlier version of this story incorrectly described the charges O’Keefe faced in Louisiana. He was charged with entering federal property under false pretenses, not with plotting to wiretap Sen. Mary Landrieu’s phones.

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The Guardian

This article falsely claimed that James O’Keefe was convicted for breaking into Senator Mary Landrieu’s office in Louisiana, which would be a felony conviction. It was later corrected to say that O’Keefe did not break into the office but pled guilty to entering the building under false pretenses, which is a misdemeanor.

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CNN Politics – Jake Tapper

Jake Tapper originally claimed that Project Veritas Action Fund’s video exposing
Democracy Partners in 2016 was “edited.” Tapper later fixed the characterization of the video by removing the word “edited” from that sentence.

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Observer – Davis Richardson

The original line in this story read: “By attacking the Post, O’Keefe declared war on Moore’s accusers and the entire women’s movement against sexual misconduct.” This is an outrageous lie. The line was later changed to say that “many” viewed O’Keefe as someone who declared war on Moore’s accusers and the entire women’s movement against sexual misconduct, this time without affirming that it was actually a reality. The reporter was confronted by O’Keefe over his original sentence and threatened with the possibility of legal action.

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Los Angeles Post-Examiner – Megan Wallin

Initially, LA Post-Examiner claimed that James O’Keefe pled guilty to a felony charge of breaking into Senator Mary Landrieu’s office in Louisiana. Upon being contacted by Project Veritas for publishing such a blatant falsehood, LA Post-Examiner corrected the article to say that O’Keefe pled guilty to entering the Senator’s office “under false pretenses,” which is a misdemeanor charge. 

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AlterNet – Rick Perlstein (The Washington Spectator)

This article was corrected to remove an inaccurate description of the legal charges brought in 2010 against James O’Keefe. In an earlier published version, a parenthetical phrase entered by the editor mischaracterized a crime to which O’Keefe pled guilty after he entered U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu’s office in Louisiana. O’Keefe was not, as was reported, “convicted of breaking into a U.S. Senator’s office to gather news,” which would result in a felony conviction. O’Keefe, in fact, pled guilty to entering the building under false pretenses, a misdemeanor charge.

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